Fifty shades of green

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Skimmia ‘Kew Green’, with evergreen fern

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Portuguese Laurel, young foliage

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Holly, variety unknown

I’ve recently discovered the excellent Blotanical.com website – a global repository of gardening blogs from around the world. Bloggers can register their site and there is a manual validation procedure to ensure that each blog

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Rhododendron ponticum variegatum, with the trainee gardeners

listed there is a bona fide website. wpid-20130104_132923.jpgYou can search for blogs by country and check out both the most popular and newest blogs. You can also ‘fave’ your favourite sites regardless of the blog platform/software they use – I think that’s a real plus-point, and send messages as well. Each blogger has a rather good ‘My Plot’ area which, as well as giving a thumbnail sketch of themselves, lists some of their garden ‘favourites’ (e.g. flower, time of year, garden etc).

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Evergreen fern, close-up

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Evergreen fern with Golden Fishing Pole Bamboo in the background

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Aucuba, spotted laurel

One of the most popular websites on Blotanical.com is MySecretGarden (http://tanyasgarden.blogspot.co.uk/) and very deserving it is too of this accolade. I know that quite a lot of you are registered on Blotanical but for those who aren’t, click on the logo at the foot of the right hand column to find out more. And no, there’s no commission for me, and no cost to you! (Hint for UK, northern Europe, maybe Oceania and US night-owl bloggers – the site is ‘faster’ earlier on in the day than later on, before our US green-fingered friends pull on their gardening gloves!)

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Holly, variety unknown

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Yucca filimentosa – hardy so far!

Anyhow, I digress. The MySecretGarden’s creator, Tatyana’s favourite colour is green. Being a bit of a ‘brighter the better’ kind of person from the late Christo Lloyd School (see Exotic Planting for Adventurous Gardeners), green wouldn’t have been my first choice, I have to say, but as I was walking around the garden in the half-gloom of an early January afternoon, I did start to notice that the prevalent colour was indeed green, and I started to look at the evergreens in a new light as they shone out in the gloom. And very welcome they are at this monochrome time of year. Thank you Tatyana!

So, pictured are just a few (not 50, you’ll be pleased to hear) of my favourite shades of green taken recently.

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Rhodo bud – colour remains a mystery, for now!

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Aucuba, spotted laurel, different variety

In the spring, we’ll be ordering one or two new shrubs for the Secret Garden and the Woodland. Note to self: include some evergreens!

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for our veggie-growing friends, Leeks…(Musselburgh variety)

 

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24 Responses to Fifty shades of green

  1. It may be straightforward to you, but I am having an inordinate amount of trouble inserting my URL etc. It keeps telling me it’s wrong, then it tells me to leave it blank, which I did, and then it tells me I have to fill it in. EEK! On top of that they don’t want minor questions like this.

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  2. Thanks for this post. Guess where I’m off to next? Correct – to check out Blotanical.com.
    I love the different shades of green in my garden. I also once did a post on fifty shades of grey in the garden, with photos of rocks, stones and paving. It’s a catchy title these days 🙂

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  3. catharinehoward says:

    aconites already.

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  4. Today we have GREEN. The weather is 64° in chilly Niagara Falls. White is on the way though.

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  5. Carolyn says:

    I must admit, it was sweet pleasure to click on your post and see the the beautiful shades of verdure you present. Our gardens are buried underneath a deep blanket of snow, no green here. Your post was indeed… refreshing!

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  6. Helen Johnstone says:

    Just found your blog via Blotanical. Love your garden, so jealous of those walls

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  7. paulinemulligan says:

    Its the shades of evergreen and gold and silver that keep the winter garden interesting while the flowers have a rest.
    Watch out for Garden Bloggers Foliage Day on the 22nd of each month hosted by Christina at My Hesperides Garden where super foliage from round the world can be seen for those interested in foliage!

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  8. I have a few sections of my shade garden that are green and white. It’s really soothing, especially in the heat of summer. Blotanical is a great site. 🙂

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  9. Jean says:

    Love all your shades of green (and those trainee gardeners, too :-)). I’m glad I’m not the only one who has trouble telling which rhododendron buds are flowers and which are new foliage. Some years, I think I have it all figured out and am pleased at how many big fat flower buds my temperamental Rhododendron catawbiense in the back garden is sporting; but then in spring, they may well turn out to be exceptionally big and fat leaf buds.

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  10. pbmgarden says:

    I appreciate the value of green foliage more and more–you have some nice textures too.

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  11. Nice to see all the green…not much green here…welcome to Blotanical!

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  12. angiesgardendiaries says:

    It’s difficult to avoid green at the moment isn’t it. There are so many evergreens to choose from so good luck with whittling down your list 🙂

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