A Midsummer Evening in a Scottish Country Garden

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Sometimes, some green can be relaxing and a welcome antidote to the explosion of colour that surrounds us in our borders at this time of year. This year, having our big mower  out of commission for a while forced us to reconsider the value of grass as a plant in its own right. We therefore decided to leave the new grass areas in the walled garden unmown just to see what happens. The grass is now developing seed-heads which, back-lit against the late evening sun, are quite beautiful, the whole area shimmering like brushed velvet in a light breeze. Later in the summer, we will start mowing this grass once again but not before this particular display is over. In the meantime, we will continue to use the Flymo to carve interesting grass paths round the edges, and in some of the informal areas through its midst, saving us a lot of time, and a lot of fuel!

For the rest of this post, we thought we’d let the photos tell the story. We hope you like them.

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the first of the newly-sown wild flowers starting to show, with the new Medlar, currently in flower and the wonderfully-scented lupins over to the right

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the verbascums and lupins of the south border, with the grey- leaved giant thistle starting to make its presence felt

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the herb garden, probably at its best at the moment, with some young rocket and flowering chives

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some cottage-garden favourites in the south facing border – foxgloves (Digitalis), Delphinium and more lupins!

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a spectacle of lupins, sentinals of our new Acer palmatum Sangokaku

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Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’, we think!

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Granny’s Bonnets (Aquilegia), all colour-combinations possible!

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and finally, out in the Policies, the extraordinarily-ornate and exotic blooms of the blue Iris, completely hardy in our cold climate!

In like a lamb and out like a lion, and that’s just the first week!

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P.denticulata

The battleship grey skies and cold temperatures have returned, with even a light covering of snow this morning, heralding (according to the long-range forecast) a rather more wintry March than we had last year.

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The new Lonicera hedge “Great Expectations”!

Still the Good Lady was able to take advantage of some better weather in the early part of the week with some frenzied hoeing, concluding the work we were doing last weekend on the rose beds. The herb bed too has been hoed over as have the two vegetable beds in the rear part of the walled garden. The GL too planted out some Lonicera (shrubby honeysuckle) cuttings that had rooted over the winter to make a low hedge around one of the vegetable beds. These rooted amazingly quickly in the late summer and over the winter and will very quickly establish, although they are likely to require 2 or 3 trims a year. The other vegetable bed has lavender round it. These plants we grew from seed last year and are still quite small although we should get some good flowering in the mid-late summer. The box cuttings we took in the autumn have come through the winter well and these should be showing signs of root as the spring advances. When large enough, these too will be used to edge some of the borders.

wpid-20130309_100517.jpgIn the greenhouse, the sweet pea seeds have been planted, together with some ‘All the Year Round’ lettuce, some mysterious ‘trial’ leeks and some assorted wild flowers. It’s pretty early for seed-sowing here, but none of these need much heat and I’m hopeful that we’ll get some bright weather over the next few weeks which will bring them through. We’ll probably leave the herbaceous seed for a few more weeks, though, until the overnight temperatures are more consistently above 0 degrees C.

wpid-20130309_095613.jpgTaking a wander-round this morning, it was good to see the Primula denticulata (the drumstick primulas) starting to emerge from their basal cluster of leaves; we grew quite a lot of these from seed a couple of years ago and their flowering season is quite long. The first little flower of our Pulmonaria ‘Sissinghurst White’ has also appeared in the shade border – a picture will follow in a few weeks’ time when a few more have emerged!

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A. palmatum ‘Sangokaku’

And finally for this week, I was very taken with the coral-pink stems of our new Acer palmatum ‘Sangokaku’ which we put in a year ago – it’s certainly giving our red-stemmed Cornus a run for its money!