Warm Winter

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Lupins in December? Who’d have believed that?

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The Hybrid Teas are still producing quite reasonable blooms

What an amazingly mild couple of weeks we’ve had here in Scotland. Temperatures of 14C in Inverness, 13C down here in South East Scotland with the last few nights not dropping lower than 10C! Many summer nights (and days for that matter!) are colder! Very strange weather! Still, it’s to turn colder next week…

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Achillea

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Not quite Africa, but these Marigolds are enjoying the winter warmth

We’ve entered a relatively quiet time in the garden, hence fewer posts, with the winter clear-up now underway. The leaf-raking season has run on longer this year but our leafmould box is nearly full now. Last weekend was spent cleaning up after the storms of the previous week. Despite our trampoline ending up lodged against an apple tree, the Greenhouse remained unscathed but there was a mass of twigs and small branches to clear up from the lawn.

This weekend, weather permitting, I’ll be tidying up the borders, removing material that has been broken by the wind or has simply turned into a brown mess. I’ll leave what I can though including all the upright material, including attractive stems and seed-heads which can be quite ornamental in a monochrome sort of way, but, with a zing of frost, a real Christmassy feature!

There’s some strimming to be done, too, under the old apple trees and round the edge of the policies in preparation for the spring bulbs, and with all this warmth we’ve had recently, we may well see these starting to come through much sooner than usual, starting with those marvellous yellow winter aconites!

The Christmas holidays approach – a welcome break from the daily commute, heralding the start of the winter pruning season…

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The delicate bloom of a David Austin rose

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Seasonal shades

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A David Austin rose at dawn. After a dormant period in late summer, all the roses are coming back into flower for a late autumn display!

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Well, it’s been quite a growing season here in South-East Scotland.

A spring, albeit late, free of severe frosts.

A summer, predominantly dry with plentiful sunshine and real warmth.

And an autumn, still continuing (just!), warm with reasonable sunshine and plenty moisture, which means that the garden is still looking quite good. One or two seasonal snaps for you, then, taken in the last couple of weeks, including, I’m afraid, yet more of the ‘Bishops’ Children’ whose colours are intense and a real pick-me-up on those duller autumn days! Their days. I fear, may though be numbered as the mercury has somewhat dipped these past few nights…

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Dahlia ‘Bishops Children’, with Verbena bonariensis in the background underplanted by the fresh green of self-sowing poppies

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Some Hostas put on a better autumn show than others; sadly it is very fleeting! This one is Hosta ‘Mr Big’

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The Nerines, transplanted a couple of year’s ago from my Uncle’s garden, have this year put on an excellent show

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the wonderfully-architectural Onopordon, the Giant Thistle, with seed heads aplenty (with some saved for the next display some two year’s hence)

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one of the Hybrid Teas, back in bloom after their summer rest, with the dark-leaved Acer in the background

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Much beloved by the blackbirds, a Cotoneaster in full berry, with the leaves just starting to turn

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African Marigold, seemingly very at home in a Scottish autumn!

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a Lupin in its second flush. We cut them back in July after the first flowering which very often brings a second autumnal flush.

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Year 2 of the ‘Musselburgh’ leeks; we couldn’t eat them all last winter, so left them in the ground for ornamental flowering this year. These have put on an excellent, and very long-lasting show, and are well worth growing just for the wonderful globe seed-heads!

Preparing for the summer show

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Delphinium ‘spires’

A break in the weather from a succession of warm, dry, sultry days to a breezy mixture of sunshine and showers is welcome. These past two weekends there has been much ferrying of watering cans to far-flung corners of the garden just to keep the newly planted bedding plants in existence but they don’t really develop properly without a decent shower of real rain.

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Aquilegia and Foxgloves

This weekend saw the final lot of summer bedding being planted out; the Good Lady has been planting up the Dahlia beds (Bishops Children and T&M Dwarf Mixed) and Mesembryanthemums under the hybrid tea roses; these will knit together over the summer providing a wonderful multi-coloured backdrop of brightly-coloured daisies. Meanwhile the Cosmos and Sunflowers are developing thick stems and putting on good growth.  The dayglo-flowering Californian poppies have also been planted into the borders, providing a shock of neon brilliance to the demure herbaceous visitor! We’ve had good germination of bedding this year so have been filling spaces in the borders with more Dahlias and African marigolds (Calendula) and have also been planting up a few more terracotta pots.

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French marigolds, which smell as good as they look!

This year, the spring bedding has been really excellent, with the black tulips only just going over now and the winter pansies still merrily flowering their heads off! 20130626-202225.jpgWhile we’ve planted up most of the pots with summer bedding (Cosmos, French marigolds mainly), we’ll let the spring ones run full-term as I always despair at the Council parks which proceed to rip up their spring bedding just when it is at its best, only to replace it with several weeks of bare soil before they put their summer bedding in!

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the colourful shade border, just coming into its best – the subject of a future post!

We’ve also been planting out and potting on some of this, and last, year’s biennials and perennials. The Echium fastuosum ‘Pride of Madeira’ and the baby Hostas I’ve been moving onto larger pots for planting out next spring; the former is frost-tender, won’t flower until next year and I’ll need to be able to move them into the greenhouse come the autumn. The latter, while making good growth and starting to show some interesting leaf variations (in terms of shape, size and colour) are just too little to put out, but they should be fine for next spring. The Pyrethrums we’ve been planting out in various places and we now have a line of young Catmint (Nepeta) along the front of the west-facing Yew hedge; I don’t think it will flower this year (it normally flowers in June/ July) but the young plants are thickening up well and should make a good show this time next year. The Aquilegia ‘Firecracker’, Acanthus ‘Bears’ Breeches’, and the Echinacea “Magic Box” should be ready in a couple of weeks. Other herbaceous seedlings are making rather slower progress and will be gradually potted on as they develop.

So the greenhouse is gradually emptying, leaving more space for the tomatoes, now planted into the soil, which are making good progress, with some early fruit forming already. Our Black Hamburg grape too is showing many clusters of fruit; it requires a weekly prune at this time of the year, its shoots growing about a metre a week!

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shrub rose in the Kitchen Garden, variety unknown, which has never flowered like this before. It was cut back hard two years ago, produced lots of growth but no flowers last year, was not pruned over the winter (I never quite got round to it) and is now covered with these amazing 5 inch flowers!