Warm Winter

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Lupins in December? Who’d have believed that?

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The Hybrid Teas are still producing quite reasonable blooms

What an amazingly mild couple of weeks we’ve had here in Scotland. Temperatures of 14C in Inverness, 13C down here in South East Scotland with the last few nights not dropping lower than 10C! Many summer nights (and days for that matter!) are colder! Very strange weather! Still, it’s to turn colder next week…

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Achillea

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Not quite Africa, but these Marigolds are enjoying the winter warmth

We’ve entered a relatively quiet time in the garden, hence fewer posts, with the winter clear-up now underway. The leaf-raking season has run on longer this year but our leafmould box is nearly full now. Last weekend was spent cleaning up after the storms of the previous week. Despite our trampoline ending up lodged against an apple tree, the Greenhouse remained unscathed but there was a mass of twigs and small branches to clear up from the lawn.

This weekend, weather permitting, I’ll be tidying up the borders, removing material that has been broken by the wind or has simply turned into a brown mess. I’ll leave what I can though including all the upright material, including attractive stems and seed-heads which can be quite ornamental in a monochrome sort of way, but, with a zing of frost, a real Christmassy feature!

There’s some strimming to be done, too, under the old apple trees and round the edge of the policies in preparation for the spring bulbs, and with all this warmth we’ve had recently, we may well see these starting to come through much sooner than usual, starting with those marvellous yellow winter aconites!

The Christmas holidays approach – a welcome break from the daily commute, heralding the start of the winter pruning season…

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The delicate bloom of a David Austin rose

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Preparing for spring

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A calm, dry weekend allowed us to finish off the herbaceous border work for the winter. All stems have now been cut down to ground level, allowing the new growth to come through unimpeded. Some plants are already starting to make some good progress and I think that the colour and form of some of the new herbaceous shoots as they come through equal the flowers that come later on.

wpid-20121103_092640-1.jpgWe’ve also given the hybrid tea roses a good prune back this year, having found that the harder we prune them, the more blooms we get. In the cuttings bed, meanwhile, all of the hardwood cuttings we took from the self-same roses last autumn seem to have come through the winter, with some promising buds and new shoots appearing. It won’t be until later in the spring or early summer when we’ll be able to see for sure which ones have struck root.

In the greenhouse, I had a look at last year’s seedlings which are now starting to show signs of life. The baby Hostas and Rudbeckia Goldsturm are now pushing out new leaves, as is the Acanthus (Bears Breeches) and the Kniphofia (Red Hot Poker). As the grass, Pennisetum ‘Tall Feathers’ has remained evergreen in the greenhouse unlike the ones we planted in the autumn outside, they were in need of potting on from their 2”x 1” modules, as were the Eupatorium ‘Joe- Pye Weed’, although these have been dormant over the winter. Significant root growth suggests, though, that these are about to burst into life!

I took a wander round to the old pleasure grounds to see if the carpets of snowdrops were out yet. Walking through the woods, the calm air was filled with the heady scent of the Viburnumwpid-20130303_114250.jpg

bodnantense which are the best I’ve seen them for years. Some of the snowdrops are out, but by no means all. I was rewarded, though, by the sight of a pair of beautiful Roe Deer at close range.

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